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Mission 2014. Our Return.

Forget reminiscing.

Time to write a new chapter.

After more than a decade, Porsche is returning to the LMP1 class of the FIA World
Endurance Championship in 2014. And to the toughest race of all, the 24 Hours of Le Mans.
Our strategy? The same one that we employ when developing every Porsche – start from scratch, scrutinize every
last detail and leave the past behind.
Our principle.
Our values.
Our mission.

The infrastructure.

A look behind the scenes.

We're on a mission: a return to Le Mans – a return to the top-class motor sport of the World Endurance Championship. Our starting point: the Research and Development Center in Weissach and the Porsche Motorsport center in Flacht. Only here could our latest vision become reality: the new LMP1 prototype.

It was with the LMP1 in mind that we expanded the infrastructure of our Research and Development Center yet again.
Giving our enthusiastic employees a new goal: "Mission 2014. Our Return."

Go on a journey of discovery at the location where our mission is taking shape. The hotspots on the map allow you to take a look behind the scenes of our LMP1 project.

The technology.

The overall concept is what matters.

There are only a few months left until our return to one of the world’s toughest racing series. And what is arguably the most famous long-distance race of all time. We’ve won 16 times at Le Mans. But this time we’re starting from scratch again. So that our new prototype embodies the ultimate goal of every Porsche: an intelligent overall concept.

Delve into the very latest technical advances and radical new rules which have stretched our engineers to their limits.
Overall concept
Drive system
Aerodynamics
Lightweight construction
Safety

The preparation.

One mission – one team.

Equipment. Technicians. Racing drivers. Engineers and strategists. The success of a team requires more than just a fast car. Like an engine, the different components must work together like clockwork. Individually, but even more importantly, as a team. Meticulous preparation is therefore indispensable.
Truck construction
Drivers
Simulator
Pit Stop

The 919 Hybrid.

The vehicle.

This is the car for our return to top-class motorsports at the FIA World Endurance Championship and the 24 Hours of Le Mans. The 919 Hybrid. The car for our return that stole our hearts all those years ago – the 8.462 miles that mean everything to us – the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

After more than two years in development, our latest interpretation of the racing lab of our visions stands in front of us in our Le Mans Prototype.

Whether for its spectacular looks, pioneering technology or performance on the track, it is definitely worth taking a more detailed look behind the scenes.
Current highlights
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The identity
The technology
The heritage
The destination

Current highlights.

The reveal of the 919 Hybrid

Missed the reveal of the 919 Hybrid? No problem. Watch a recording of the event here.

Behind the scenes of an LMP1 Test

Our protagonist has a name:

917: First Porsche overall winning car in Le Mans.
918: Fastest road vehicle on the Nordschleife.
A number sequence that stands for sports car history. Representing our desire to come as close as possible to creating the ideal sports car. And today sees that quest continue with the Porsche 919 Hybrid.

The LMP1 prototype combines everything we have learned from 60 years of motorsports and 16 overall victories in Le Mans. An intelligent overall concept which fulfils all of the requirements for a sports car of the future: highly advanced hybrid technology, uncompromising performance and maximum efficiency.

That’s why this race car deserves a name that will fit in seamlessly in the sequence of its prestigious predecessors – the Porsche 919 Hybrid.

Roll-out

Mission started. The roll-out of the new race car prototype marks a critical phase in the 'Mission 2014. Our Return' project for the return of Porsche to top-class motor sports. Every idea has been reconsidered, every detail scrutinized and the stopwatch for vehicle development has been reset. The vehicle has already completed its first test run with Porsche works driver Timo Bernhard behind the wheel. An important milestone for the long road back to the prototype class in the 24 Hours of Le Mans.
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Our principle.
Give it your all. Mobilize reserves you never even knew you had. Cruise to victory and look ahead to the next challenge from the winner's podium. Start from scratch again.

For us, this is the key to creating something great. To moving forward. To conquering new territory. What work of art doesn't begin with a blank canvas? What great idea doesn't begin with a blank sheet of paper?

This is the principle that has guided Porsche for more than 65 years. To put every idea, every technology, every detail to the test. To rely not on the supposedly proven, but on the inner determination of our employees never to stand still. To use the past, our tradition, as a source of inspiration for creating innovation. And to constantly breathe new life into 'Fascination Sports Car'. With ever more efficient drives and lighter bodies.
In short, with intelligent overall concepts.

This principle has also guided us in motor sports. Even after more than 30,000 race victories, we put away our old medals. Even after 16 overall victories at Le Mans, we reset the stopwatch for the 24-hour race. We return as if we had never been there before. But with values that we have taken everywhere with us for decades.

Looking for a challenge?

Why not help us consign these images to the past? Our memory game is about all things related to motor racing history. Your job is to find the matching pairs. And to do it as quickly as possible.
Did you achieve your personal best? Share your success on Facebook – and challenge your friends to take part.

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Our values.
Our mission.
Our values.
  • The spirit
    within our serial models.
  • As a matter of principle.
    Not because of pride.
  • The racing lab
    for our visions.
Spirit.
Principle.
Vision.

The spirit within our serial models.

Sports Car or race car? To us, there is no difference. Because the very first Porsche was a race winner. And because what we learn from the race track influences the development of our standard-production vehicles. The motor sports soul that is part of every Porsche.

As a matter of principle.
Not because of pride.

We have always been involved in motor sports. Not because we had to. But because we couldn't have done anything else. Not to achieve fame. But to continuously expand our experience at the limit. Not for self-affirmation. But to continuously challenge ourselves. And not because of prestige. But as a matter of principle.

The racing lab for our visions.

To get a step closer to the ideal race car – our drivers and engineers continuously strive to make Ferry Porsche's dream a reality. Using new technologies. New goals. And new visions – that distinguish themselves on the race track. For the journey to the Sports Car of the future.

Find out more:

Our principle.
Our mission.
Our mission.
From the very first second, we were fascinated.
By the 24 Hours of Le Mans.
By the 13.621 km (8.464 mls) that mean the world to us.
Together we are embarking on a new mission.
With a return to top-class long-distance racing – the FIA World Endurance Championship. And perhaps the toughest long-distance race in the world – Le Mans.

Even after 16 overall victories we still have to start from scratch. With ambitious goals and firmly rooted values.
But above all, with the desire to take you with us on this journey – to a place where we have always given our all.

To a place that has become like a second home to us. And to a race that demands one thing above all else – team spirit.

Join us on our mission and experience Fascination Sports Car first hand. As a member of the Porsche motor sports family.

Find out more:

Our principle.
Our values.
The Research and Development Center
Welcome to the birthplace of all new Porsche models.
A place where engineering skill and commitment have always been one and the same thing: the Porsche Research and Development Center in Weissach. And the Porsche Motorsport center in Flacht.
Both locations are inextricably linked. Not only because of the test track on which standard production vehicles and race cars are put through their paces.

But also because of the unified approach of 4,000 employees who develop, discard, create and improve ideas for serial production and motor sports.
For the fascination Sports Car of today and our visions for tomorrow.
The test track.
From standard-production vehicles to race cars: every new Porsche completes its first test run on our test track in Weissach where it has to prove its fitness for the road or race track. The test drivers and engineers are in constant communication to ensure they react immediately if the smallest of anomalies should occur.
This is the only way to develop the optimal Sports Car and turn the racing vision of tomorrow into reality.

Sit in the virtual passenger seat and experience the test track at high speed.
The test stands.
We have test stands
for all types of components
in Weissach. The four-wheel
test stand even allows us
to test-drive the complete
Le Mans track
including pit stops.
Alexander Hitzinger,
Director of Engineering LMP1
Engine development.
The driving simulator.
The new driving simulator is also being developed under considerable time pressure and prepared for its first use by engineers in Flacht. The objective: to simulate technical changes carried out on the vehicle – with direct driver feedback. The complex technology consists of a motion platform with a monocoque, steering wheel and pedals.
The simulator creates a driving experience that is close to the real thing. It also provides an exact reproduction of the profile and the environment of the race track. In this way, the driver can prepare for every curve, every straight, every chicane and every detail. Long before the green lights come on.
The Motorsport center.
Motor sports history
isn't written in
a couple of hours,
days or weeks.
Motor sports history has to develop or be developed, such as by our engineers. They've been working on this for years in the Porsche Motorsport center in Flacht. This is where some of the most successful race cars in the world are developed. More than 2,800 911 GT3 Cup cars were built here and delivered to customer teams worldwide. And this is where the spearhead of Porsche GT vehicles is built and prepared for the works team: the 911 RSR.

Its debut: the World Endurance Championship (WEC). The highlight so far: a double victory in the GTE Pro class at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 2013. This and victory in the GTE AM class were the 99th and 100th class victories in the most difficult long-distance race in the world.
But we don't rest on our laurels in Flacht: at the moment, we're preparing for the WEC 2014, our return to international top-class motor sports.

The protagonist of Mission 2014: the new LMP1 vehicle. The quantity? Minimum. The cost of development? Enormous. An elaborate infrastructure was solely created for our return to the top classifications at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. With short distances: the various LMP1 departments that coordinate the development and test runs of the new prototype are located under one roof in the new LMP1 center.

For example, in the workshop where the vehicle is being built and is taking shape. On the test stands, in the wind tunnel and on the test track where every lap brings new insights. In the driving simulator that the team uses to prepare in great detail.
A team of highly motivated employees working towards a single goal:
"Mission 2014.
Our Return."
The LMP1 infrastructure.
The LMP1 center.
With more than 130 engineers,
the necessary laboratories
and a local test track,
the conditions for our return
to LMP1 prototype sports
are excellent.
Fritz Enzinger – Vice President LMP1
The LMP1 center is the
heart of our project.
Developing a complete vehicle
in a single building
is certainly
a unique situation.
It means very
short distances.
Fritz Enzinger – Vice President LMP1
The project team.
The LMP1 workshop.
The workshop doesn't only
produce the engine, gearbox and
high-voltage components. The
vehicle is completely
assembled here and prepared
for the test track. Even our
pit crew is practicing here
for the race track,
fighting for every
tenth of a second.
Andreas Seidl, Director of Race Operations LMP1
Pit stop trainingVehicle body construction and wrappingHigh-voltage systemSeat box
Pit stop training.
A fraction of a second counts during a pit stop. A good reason for meticulous pit stop training in Flacht. Nothing is left to chance. Every step is analyzed and improved. Because the rules must be strictly observed – as part of a precisely controlled sequence:

Did you know that the hybrid prototype has to be earthed first?
Or that work on the vehicle is practically proscribed during refueling? The tires can only be replaced afterwards – one by one.

Can you work as fast as our technicians? Take the test – with our pit stop training session. Test yourself – with our pit-stop game. And don’t give up, because only practice makes perfect.
Pit stop training
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Vehicle body construction and wrapping
The protagonist for our return is being built in the LMP1 workshop. And here, where the LMP1 prototype is taking shape, meticulous preparation prior to testing is also being carried out. Secrecy is of the essence. A camouflage body wrap hides the vehicle contours as much as possible.
The objective: to hide the aerodynamic details from curious spectators. In order to be able to test the vehicle under protective conditions. Until it lines up for the start: of "Mission 2014. Our Return."
The high-voltage system.
A crucial part of the new rules? Vehicle efficiency. The maximum amount of energy per lap is prescribed – for the combustion engine and hybrid system. Get to know the high-voltage system (HV system) where the electrical
components of the hybrid system are tested. And where the challenges posed by the rules kindle the ambition of our engineers.
The seat box.
Even in a high-tech world a single factor can make a significant difference. People, for example. This is why we focused on the driver from the very start of development of the LMP1 prototype. We use the feedback from our drivers' "seat box" experience when designing the cockpit.
To ensure optimum ergonomics in their future place of work. How can you arrange switches and buttons so they can be accessed intuitively in any situation? Our LMP1 works drivers, Timo Bernhard is one of them, gave us the answers.
The overall concept.
The aim is to combine the most efficient combustion engine possible with the maximum recovery potential and the most effective hybrid system.
Alexander Hitzinger,
Head of LMP1 Development
2014 will see the introduction of completely new rules for the FIA World Endurance Championship and the 24 Hours of Le Mans. These rules will restore prototype sport to the status which has always been a hallmark of the highest class in long-distance motor racing: putting tomorrow’s technologies through their paces today in the toughest of motorsports tests.

The WEC rules therefore present us with many different challenges. They lay down strict requirements pertaining to efficiency, safety, and sustainability in motorsports. In short: vehicles that are future-proof. These requirements have inspired our engineers to carry on what Porsche has been doing for over 60 years. Avoiding an either/or approach to isolated technologies, and instead examining every possible parameter without losing sight of the overall picture.
How good is your knowledge?
New rules. New challenges. And new questions to which our engineers had to find answers. Now it’s your turn: test your knowledge in our Expert Check.
As well as answering questions about the vehicle, you can also test your knowledge of the new rules which will apply to the Le Mans prototype class. And find out whether you’re in top form for the 24 Hours of Le Mans.
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There’s an old saying among racing drivers which says:
„To finish
  • first
  • last
, you have to finish,
  • first
  • last
.”
What reforms are incorporated into the new rules for the 2014 season?
Works teams may only compete with hybrid vehicles in the top classifications.
Visible external components must not form a continuous surface.
The prototypes must have a closed monocoque.
The new rules limit the amount of energy (in megajoules) available to the LMP1 vehicles per lap. What range of megajoules per lap may be supplied by the electric machine to the combustion engine during the race?
How much energy is 8 megajoules?
0,5
1
2,2
kW/h is the same as 8 MJ.
average office worker(s) use(s) 8 MJ of energy per day.
kg of firewood is equivalent in energy terms to .076 therm.
The top priority at all times is the safety of drivers and everyone else involved. This is why the new rules stipulate that the seat position in the cockpit must be...
higher
lower
How many World Endurance Championship races will Porsche take part in with the LMP1?
Which abbreviation is used to refer to the kinetic energy recovery system?
SSystem
EEnergy
KKinetic
RRecovery
What is the maximum combination of energy recovery systems permitted in an LMP1 vehicle?
Two KERS (front and rear axle)
One exhaust gas energy recovery system
One KERS
One KERS and one exhaust gas energy recovery system
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The drive system.
To finish first, you have to finish, first.
“To finish first, you have to finish, first.” Le Mans proves the continued relevance of this old saying among racing drivers like no other race. Even though seconds can seem like an eternity in motorsports, success or failure in the legendary long-distance classic is determined by the reliability of the technology and the concentration of drivers, mechanics, and race engineers. And these have to be sustained for a whole 24 hours.

Could we not have assumed that our past 16 overall victories were the perfect preparation for this challenge? That would have been both unprofessional and impossible, since the new rules will usher in a new era at Le Mans in 2014. In the LMP1 class, the principle of dominance through maximum performance will give way to the demand for efficiency. For the first time in the race’s history, all of the teams in the top classification must compete with hybrid racing vehicles. The choice of gasoline or diesel vehicle, displacement, number of cylinders, and even the use of a turbocharger is, however, left up to the team. What counts is the intelligence of the overall concept.
This requirement spurred our engineers on.
This requirement spurred our engineers on to explore all the potential of the drive system. So that our new prototype represents a particularly intelligent combination of the traditional combustion engine and the electric machine. The obvious solution would have been to start with an inherently economical diesel engine, not least because of recent successes in this area. But we’ve chosen to forge our own path. Instead of a diesel engine, we’ve developed a compact and turbocharged two-liter four-cylinder gasoline engine.

Next we had to deal with technical issues relating to the electric machine. Should kinetic energy recovery via KERS take place on the front or rear axle? Should there be an exhaust gas energy recovery system instead? Or both? And which accumulator should be used? The flywheel accumulator which has already proved its worth in the 911 GT3 R Hybrid? Ultracaps? Or a lithium-ion battery?
What we chose for the LMP1 vehicle: a design where the combustion engine is supported by two energy recovery systems and its own high-performance battery, developed together with our battery supplier A123. The result is an optimal overall vehicle concept which complies with the new rules.

During all our deliberations, the goal remained the same: the well-planned utilization of the vehicle’s full energy potential. This was the only way to make sure that the extra energy needed for boosting could be generated.
What we chose for the LMP1 vehicle: its own high-performance battery.
Even though the teams are given plenty of room for maneuver in terms of technical development, the rules lay down strict requirements for racing vehicles. And the key feature is a clearly defined efficiency formula, which regulates the amount of energy which may be supplied per lap. The KERS is allowed to supply the combustion engine with between 2 and 8 megajoules of extra electrical energy. This is a variable value which also determines fuel consumption: the more electrical energy supplied to the drive system, the less conventional fuel available for the lap. The rules also limit the energy which may be used for boosting.
A side effect of this efficiency formula is that it requires all the teams to take key strategic decisions.
A side effect of this efficiency formula is that it requires all the teams to take key strategic decisions: what is the ideal ratio between conventional fuel and electrical energy per lap? Where can the driver gain a few tenths of a second by using boosting? Or in other words, who can squeeze the most out of a fixed amount of energy?

The tens of thousands of variables and countless possible set-ups mean that calculations to identify the most efficient overall package are extremely complicated and time-consuming. But it takes much less time to work out whether the optimum set-up has been found: just 24 hours on the race track.
The most important decision parameters:
The aerodynamics.
it’s not necessarily the fastest vehicle that will win at Le Mans.
The new rules have made one thing clear from the start: it’s not necessarily the fastest vehicle that will win at Le Mans. Instead, the victory will go to the most coherent overall concept. A balanced use of the prescribed amount of energy will not be the only crucial factor in this respect. It’s equally important to prevent energy losses wherever possible. What really matters here is the LMP1 vehicle’s aerodynamics. Given the emphasis placed on this aspect by the new rules, this was one of the main challenges facing our technicians; the fundamental significance of efficiency means that it is more important than ever before to achieve as little drag as possible. Or more precisely: the main challenge is to achieve the maximum downforce with minimum drag.

The result? Intense activity in our wind tunnel. Our engineers meticulously tested the aerodynamic properties of the new prototype. They got useful answers to their questions - and then found new questions to ask. How can the cd value be further optimized?
And which details can be improved in order to achieve the ambitious goals held by the team as a whole?

A central aspect of development: the aerodynamic concept had to be fine-tuned in such a way that it would work not only on a track such as Le Mans known for high speeds, but also on all the other tracks of the FIA World Endurance Championship. The rear wing and the balance between aeroperformance and aerosensitivity play a key role in this respect: in a flat position, it creates less drag and therefore more speed. In contrast, a steeper angle of attack increases downforce: the force which acts on the rear axle during driving and which increases stability. The optimum set-up therefore provides for an ideal balance between downforce and speed – on every race track.
The optimum set-up therefore provides for an ideal balance between downforce and speed.
Lightweight construction.
Porsche has long been engaged in the fight for fractions of a second.
Porsche has long been engaged in the fight for fractions of a second. Yet even before that, our engineers were faced with a similar challenge: the fight for every gram, which has always been an everyday challenge for us in series production. As a Sports Car manufacturer, Porsche insisted on consistent lightweight construction from the word go. Time and again it has attracted attention due to its innovative choice of materials. And the LMP1 racing vehicle stays true to this design philosophy. We are merely continuing something that is now required of all participants by the rules: reducing the weight of the vehicles.

Carbon has become the material of choice to achieve this. But once again, we have chosen to strike out on our own: every individual components is based on sophisticated designs, and every detail has been further optimized using highly complex calculations. As well as carbon fiber, we also use other high-tech materials such as high-strength aluminum, magnesium, and various titanium alloys, which are otherwise mainly used in aircraft construction.
We don’t see lightweight construction as an end in itself.
But we don’t see lightweight construction as an end in itself. It is an opportunity to fine-tune the overall vehicle concept. Every kilogram saved on the chassis can be used for a larger KERS, for example. For greater performance. And for a competitive edge in terms of efficiency which can be crucial during the laps at Le Mans.
Safety.
The top priority for Porsche is always the same: people.
Whether Sports Car or thoroughbred racing vehicle, the top priority for every Porsche is always the same: people. Your safety when you get into a Porsche is of supreme importance to us, and the same is true for the safety of our works drivers. During all our technical deliberations, and in every strategic decision, our number one concern is always the driver. Or to be more precise, their safety – in every situation. The new rules make driver safety an even more important consideration, and they were a crucial factor right from the start of work on the LMP1 vehicle.
Seat position and field of vision
according to the old rules
Seat position and field of vision
according to the new rules
The prototype has a closed monocoque which gives the driver more space than previously, and which is strengthened with additional side panels made from a material similar to that used for bullet-proof vests. These panels are intended to protect the driver in the event of a side impact and prevent the control arms penetrating the cockpit if a wheel comes off.
So that even when pushing vehicles to the limit we never lose sight of our top priority: the safety of everyone involved.
All of the materials are selected to comply with strict safety criteria. Long before the driver takes his seat in the cockpit, the enlarged chassis has to prove its reliability in crash tests. Or in the very situations that we do our best to prevent in the first place. By giving the driver improved vision and more control, for example. A higher line of vision and lower wheel housings mean that the driver has a better view of the track. At the instigation of Porsche, further safety measures which improve the driver’s seat position were also included in the rules: a higher monocoque, more headroom and a clearly prescribed helmet position. So that even when pushing vehicles to the limit we never lose sight of our top priority: the safety of everyone involved.

In Le Mans alone, more than 50 vehicles are on the track at the start of the race. The drivers are cheered on by 250,000 spectators on average. The track marshals’ flags are in permanent use. The new prototype meets all the requirements which mean that everyone has the best possible protection in critical situations. By means of cable retainers, for example. They prevent the tires coming off the vehicle in the event of a crash, which could be dangerous for drivers, spectators or other participants.
Seat position and field of vision
according to the old rules
Seat position and field of vision
according to the new rules
Safety from the driver’s point of view.
Truck construction.
At home on the road.
The race truck is clearly the slowest member of the team. Yet it is indispensable. Because it ensures that the race cars and equipment arrive at the race track in immaculate condition.
It also functions as an operating centre. Every detail is made to measure and exactly fits the demands of the LMP1 team.
The drivers.
Born for the track.
Talent, team spirit, physical fitness, concentration, a high standard of technological understanding and a keen sense for the limits – all of these are preconditions for success on the race track.
This is why we are proud to be returning to top-class motor sports with outstanding drivers who meet these criteria.
Their wide range of experience and irrepressible urge to move forward makes them permanent members of our motor sports family.
Timo Bernhard
Personal details
Nationality:GER
Date of Birth: 24th February 1981
Place of Birth:Homburg (Saar), GER
Place of Residence:Bruchmühlbach-Miesau, GER
Height/Weight:174 cm/60 kg
Hobbies:running, music, rally sports
Internet:www.timo-bernhard.de
Twitter:not specified
I have been able to experience many happy moments up to now, but one big personal goal remains: To win Le Mans with Porsche.
Sporting career
2013
Porsche Works Driver
2nd Place 24 Hours of Le Mans (GTE PRO)
7th Place 24-hour race at Nürburgring (class winner)
Overall winner ADAC Saarland Rallye (German Rallye Championship)
2012
Porsche Works Driver
2nd Place FIA World Endurance Championship/12-hour race at Sebring (LMP1, overall class ranking)
VLN/Veranstaltergemeinschaft Langstrecke Nürburgring (various races, 2 spots on the podium)
2011
Porsche Works Driver
1st Place 24-hour race at Nürburgring (overall class ranking)
5th Place American Le Mans Series/12-hour race at Sebring (LMP1, overall class ranking)
3 podium spots Intercontinental Le Mans Championship (LMP1, overall class ranking)
2010
Porsche Works Driver
1st Place 24 Hours of Le Mans (overall class ranking)
ADAC Racing Driver of the Year
VLN/Veranstaltergemeinschaft Langstrecke Nürburgring (various races, 2 victories)
2009
Porsche Works Driver
1st Place 24-hour race at Nürburgring (overall class ranking)
4th Place Grand-Am Series Championship (DP, 4 podium spots)
6th Place 24-hour race in Daytona (overall class ranking)
24 Hours of Le Mans (LMP1)
Romain Dumas
Personal details
Nationality:FRA
Date of Birth: 14th December 1977
Place of Birth:Alès, FRA
Place of Residence:Basel, SUI
Height/Weight:174 cm/62 kg
Hobbies:jet-skiing, running, rally sports
Internet:www.romaindumas.com
Twitter:not specified
France is my home. Porsche is my motorsports family. If you add the two together, Le Mans will be an important week for me.
Sporting career
2013
Porsche Works Driver
1st Place 24 Hours of Le Mans (GTE PRO)
1st Place 24-hour race at Nürburgring (SP7)
2012
Porsche Works Driver
1st Place FIA World Endurance Championship/6-hour race at Spa (LMP1, overall class ranking)
1st Place American Le Mans Series/Mosport (LMP1, overall class ranking)
2nd Place FIA World Endurance Championship/12-hour race at Sebring (LMP1, overall class ranking)
VLN/Veranstaltergemeinschaft Langstrecke Nürburgring (2 races, 1 spot on the podium)
1st Place Pikes Peak International Hill Climb (open class, Best Rookie 2012)
2011
Porsche Works Driver
1st Place 24-hour race at Nürburgring (overall class ranking)
1st Place American Le Mans Series/Laguna Seca (GTH)
24 Hours of Le Mans (LMP1)
VLN/Veranstaltergemeinschaft Langstrecke Nürburgring (2 races, 2 podium spots, 1 victory)
2010
Porsche Works Driver
1st Place 24 Hours of Le Mans (overall class ranking)
1st Place 24-hour race at Spa (overall class ranking)
1st Place American Le Mans Series/Mosport (LMP1, overall class ranking)
24-hour race at Nürburgring
2009
Porsche Works Driver
1st Place 24-hour race at Nürburgring (overall class ranking)
4th Place Grand-Am Series Championship (DP, 4 podium spots)
6th Place 24-hour race in Daytona (DP, overall class ranking)
24 Hours of Le Mans (LMP1)
Brendon Hartley
Personal details
Nationality:NZL
Date of Birth: 10th November 1989
Place of Birth:Palmerston North, NZL
Place of Residence:Milton Keynes, GBR
Height/Weight:184 cm/67 kg
Hobbies:guitar, poker, squash, mountain biking
Internet:www.brendonhartley.co.nz
Twitter:not specified
I'm a race driver through and through. Some people struggle with numbers. I fight for seconds. There's nothing else I would like to do.
Sporting career
2013
European Le Mans Series (LMP2)
Grand-Am Rolex Series
12-hour race in Bathurst
24-hour race in Daytona
24 Hours of Le Mans
Formula 1 Development Driver Simulator
2012
3rd Place FIA World Endurance Championship/6-hour race at Spa (LMP2)
3rd Place European Le Mans Series/6-hour race in Donington (LMP2)
GP2 2 races
Formula 1 Development Driver Simulator
2011
World Series by Renault 3.5
GP2 (2 races)
2010
Formula 1 Reserve Driver
World Series by Renault 3.5
GP2 (2 races)
2009
Formula 1 Test Driver
World Series by Renault 3.5
Formula 3 Euro Series
Macao Formula 3 Grand Prix
Neel Jani
Personal details
Nationality:SUI
Date of Birth: 8th December 1983
Place of Birth:Rohrschach, SUI
Place of Residence:Port, SUI
Height/Weight:172 cm/62 kg
Hobbies:sports, cross-country skiing, tennis, cycling
Internet:www.neel-jani.com
Twitter:@neeljani
Preparation is everything in a 24-hour race. You can't foresee anything, but you have to be prepared for everything.
Sporting career
2013
Porsche Works Driver
1st Place American Le Mans Series /10-hour race at Road Atlanta (LMP1, overall class ranking)
3rd Place American Le Mans Series /12-hour race at Sebring (LMP1, overall class ranking)
2nd Place American Le Mans Series /Laguna Seca (LMP1, overall class ranking)
2nd Place American Le Mans Series /Long Beach (LMP1, overall class ranking)
2012
4th Place FIA World Endurance Championship (LMP1, overall class ranking)
4th Place 24 Hours of Le Mans (overall class ranking)
2011
Overall winner Le Mans Series (LMP1)
6th Place 24 Hours of Le Mans (overall class ranking)
Formula 1 Demo drives
2010
3rd Place Le Mans Series (LMP1)
24 Hours of Le Mans
Formula 1 Demo drives
GT1 World Championship (3 races)
Superleague Formula (2 races, 1 victory)
2009
24 Hours of Le Mans (LMP1)
Formula 1 Test Driver
2nd Place A1GP (4 victories)
Marc Lieb
Personal details
Nationality:GER
Date of Birth: 4th July 1980
Place of Birth:Stuttgart, GER
Place of Residence:Ludwigsburg, GER
Height/Weight:182 cm/74 kg
Hobbies:running, football, reading
Internet:www.marc-lieb.de
Twitter:@liebmarc
It's more like the Porsche family than the Porsche team: Sometimes it's rough, sometimes it's warm-hearted. But you always know that you belong.
Sporting career
2013
Porsche Works Driver
FIA World Endurance Championship (GTE PRO)
1st Place 24 Hours of Le Mans (GTE PRO)
2nd Place 24-hour race at Spa (overall class ranking)
2012
Porsche Works Driver
FIA World Endurance Championship (GTE PRO, 2 victories, 4 podium spots)
VLN/Veranstaltergemeinschaft Langstrecke Nürburgring (2 victories, 1 podium spot)
3rd Place 24-hour race in Daytona (GT)
2011
Porsche Works Driver
1st Place 24-hour race at Nürburgring (overall class ranking)
3rd Place Le Mans Series Championship (GT)
2010
Porsche Works Driver
1st Place Le Mans Series Championship (GT, 3 victories)
1st Place 24 Hours of Le Mans (GT2)
24-hour race at Nürburgring
2009
Porsche Works Driver
1st Place Le Mans Series Championship (GT2)
1st Place 24-hour race at Nürburgring (overall class ranking)
American Le Mans Series/Sebring and Petit Le Mans
Asian Le Mans Series/Okayama, Japan (GT2, 2 races)
VLN/Veranstaltergemeinschaft Langstrecke Nürburgring (several races)
Mark Webber
Personal details
Nationality:AUS
Date of Birth: 27th August 1976
Place of Birth:Queanbeyan, AUS
Place of Residence:Buckinghamshire, GBR
Height/Weight:182 cm/75 kg
Hobbies:outdoor sports, helicopter flying
Internet:www.markwebber.com
Twitter:@AussieGrit
I have always had a passion for Porsche. That's why it is a great honour for me to return to Le Mans exactly with this team in the top motorsports.
Sporting career
2013
3rd Place FIA Formula 1 Championship (8 podium spots)
2012
6th Place FIA Formula 1 Championship (4 podium spots)
1st Place Monaco Grand Prix
1st Place British Grand Prix
2011
3rd Place FIA Formula 1 Championship (10 podium spots)
1st Place Brazilian Grand Prix
2010
3rd Place FIA Formula 1 Championship (10 podium spots)
1st Place Spanish Grand Prix
1st Place Hungarian Grand Prix
1st Place Monaco Grand Prix
1st Place British Grand Prix
2009
4th Place FIA Formula 1 Championship (8 podium spots)
1st Place German Grand Prix
1st Place Brazilian Grand Prix
The simulator.
At the digital limit.
An intelligent overall concept is a prerequisite for every Porsche race car. But as you cannot see on paper how a vehicle will behave on the track, the drivers train in the factory's own simulator.
We gain important insights into the LMP1 vehicle using simulations of the original tracks. Under near genuine physical conditions.
The pit stop.
The art of the pit stop.
A pit stop is choreographed and must be rehearsed until perfect. It is also subject to the strict rules of the FIA WEC: The technicians are only allowed to work on the car in turn, never simultaneously.
All the more important that everything runs smoothly and the race car returns to the track without unnecessary delay. What appears easy or looks like art is in actual fact the result of hard work and intensive preparation.
Pit stop training session.
Can you work as fast as our technicians? Take the test – with our pit stop training session.
Pit stop training session
The identity.
Its identity is unmistakeable.
The 919 Hybrid. Unlike a 911 GT, at first glance it’s not your typical Porsche. That’s because of the strict FIA WEC regulations on vehicle design. As a result, our latest racing car has the classic futuristic look of a Le Mans Prototype.

But its identity is unmistakable: it’s based on everything we’ve learned about motorsports in over 60 years.
Combined in our brand core: Porsche Intelligent Perfomance.

And it’s embodied in the uncompromising design of the car, brilliant white, covered with the manifestation of our brand core.

What do the letters in its design mean? They describe our way how we build Sports Cars, and always have done right from the start. It’s the way we strive to look at apparent opposites as challenges and bring them together in every vehicle. Efficiency and power. Safety and lightweight construction. Performance and day-to-day usability. And to make sure that Porsche Intelligent Performance can be found in everything we do, we channel what we learn from motor sports into our standard production vehicles.
Porsche Intelligent Performance.
The carbon incarnation of all that we stand for.
Even the name of the car, 919 Hybrid, demonstrates the link with our standard production vehicles. It’s a consistent continuation of our Hybrid strategy for the future, which has produced its first absolute highlight in the 918 Spyder Super Sports Car. And it’s the logical progression of the Le Mans success story we started with the 917 – the first Porsche overall winner.

So what do we see in the 919 Hybrid? The carbon incarnation of all that we stand for. A thoroughbred Sports Car with the typically futuristic design of an LMP and the clear identity of a Porsche. Technologically sophisticated. Streamlined. Superior.
The technology.
Power alone will not win the world title in this highest class.
The 919 Hybrid was specially developed for the FIA World Endurance Championship and for Le Mans. So it was also developed for the challenge of putting tomorrow’s technologies through today’s toughest motor sports tests.

The FIA WEC LMP1 regulations are a challenge. The strict efficiency, safety and sustainability criteria make one thing instantly clear: power alone will not win the world title in this highest class. In fact, it’s all about optimal energy efficiency with maximum performance. Now, we’ve brought all of that together in the intelligent design concept of the 919 Hybrid. For the racing car of today, and our vision of the Sports Car of tomorrow.
Combustion engine
The combustion engine is supported by two energy recovery systems. Firstly, an electric machine on the front axle recuperates braking energy and also provides assistance for acceleration.
Our choice of combustion engine: a highly compact, turbocharged four-cylinder 2-litre engine with direct fuel injection. We have used combustion chamber geometry similar to that on the 918 Spyder, which has already proved itself highly efficient.
Electric machine and battery
With the newly developed electric module, the exhaust gas powers a generator.
Secondly, a fundamentally new exhaust gas energy recuperation system contributes towards achieving optimum efficiency. With the newly developed electric module, the exhaust gas powers a generator. The energy recovered from the various systems is stored in a liquid-cooled lithium-ion battery.
Overall drive system
Years of experience in designing Sports Cars helped us to reduce the weight of individual components even further. The sports prototype is made mainly of carbon. In addition, the engine made of high-strength aluminium and the use of magnesium and various titanium alloys also helped to achieve the ideal system weight.
However, lightweight materials don’t automatically result in a lightweight construction. To get the kind of results that withstand the extreme loads of long-distance racing, our engineers had to come up with sophisticated designs and carry out highly complex calculations for individual components.
Material mix
The 919 Hybrid’s aerodynamics are designed for maximum efficiency in accordance with the new regulations. And of course, like any Sports Car, it must also have the highest possible downforce for higher cornering speeds.
That’s where the complex front section and special rear wing play a key role in achieving the perfect balance between aerosensitivity and aeroperformance. But since winning or losing an endurance race is all about the finer details, the aerodynamics are one thing above all: top secret.
Aerodynamics
Technical data
Drive:V4 turbocharged engine + hybrid system with two energy recuperation systems
Drive type:Rear wheel drive, all-wheel drive via KERS on the front axle.
Power:> 370 kW (> 500 hp) + Electric machine > 250 hp
Displacement:2,000 ccm
Top track speed:> 340 km/h
Tank capacity:68.3 l
Storage:Lithium-ion
The heritage.
Over 60 years in motorsports and more than 30,000 racing victories have brought us to where we are today. And we’re proud to have been able to make our contribution to the big names and legendary racing cars of motorsports history. A great tradition was created that has inspired us ever since.
Step-by-step, as we bring the vision of the Sports Car of the future ever closer. Join us for a trip down memory lane and to the Porsche models that have driven us to victory in overall wins at Le Mans.
Porsche overall winners at Le Mans.
Porsche 917 KH
Year:1970
Power:510 kW (693 hp)
Displacement:4,494 ccm
Torque:559 Nm at 6,800 rpm
Top track speed:340 km/h (211 mph)
Porsche 917 KH
Year:1971
Power:441 kW (600 hp)
Displacement:4,907 ccm
Torque:549 Nm at 6,500 rpm
Top track speed:350 km/h (217 mph)
Porsche 936 Spyder
Year:1976
Power:382 kW (520 hp)
Displacement:2,142 ccm
Torque:470 Nm at 6,000 rpm
Top track speed:350 km/h (217 mph)
Porsche 936 Spyder
Year:1977
Power:397 kW (540 hp)
Displacement:2,142 ccm
Torque:490 Nm at 6,000 rpm
Top track speed:350 km/h (217 mph)
Porsche 935 K3
Year:1979
Power:551 kW (750 hp)
Displacement:2,994 ccm
Torque:700 Nm at 6,600 rpm
Top track speed:360 km/h (224 mph)
Porsche 936/81 Spyder
Year:1981
Power:455 kW (620 hp)
Displacement:2,650 ccm
Torque:598 Nm at 8,400 rpm
Top track speed:360 km/h (224 mph)
Porsche 956 C LH
Year:1982
Power:456 kW (620 hp)
Displacement:2,649 ccm
Torque:618 Nm at 5,400 rpm
Top track speed:360 km/h (224 mph)
Porsche 956 C LH
Year:1983
Power:456 kW (620 hp)
Displacement:2,649 ccm
Torque:618 Nm at 5,400 rpm
Top track speed:360 km/h (224 mph)
Porsche 956 C LH
Year:1984
Power:456 kW (620 hp)
Displacement:2,649 ccm
Torque:618 Nm at 5,400 rpm
Top track speed:360 km/h (224 mph)
Porsche 956 C LH
Year:1985
Power:456 kW (620 hp)
Displacement:2,649 ccm
Torque:618 Nm at 5,400 rpm
Top track speed:360 km/h (224 mph)
Porsche 962 C LH
Year:1986
Power:514 kW (700 hp)
Displacement:2,994 ccm
Torque:696 Nm at 5,400 rpm
Top track speed:360 km/h (224 mph)
Porsche 962 C LH
Year:1987
Power:514 kW (700 hp)
Displacement:2,994 ccm
Torque:696 Nm at 5,400 rpm
Top track speed:360 km/h (224 mph)
Porsche Dauer Le Mans GT
Year:1994
Power:547 kW (745 hp)
Displacement:2,994 ccm
Torque:671 Nm at 6,000 rpm
Top track speed:365 km/h (227 mph)
Porsche WSC Spyder
Year:1996
Power:396 kW (540 hp)
Displacement:2,994 ccm
Torque:589 Nm at 5,400 rpm
Top track speed:365 km/h (227 mph)
Porsche WSC Spyder
Year:1997
Power:396 kW (540 hp)
Displacement:2,994 ccm
Torque:589 Nm at 5,400 rpm
Top track speed:365 km/h (227 mph)
Porsche 911 GT1
Year:1998
Power:400 kW (550 hp)
Displacement:3,163 ccm
Torque:589 Nm at 6,250 rpm
Top track speed:320 km/h (199 mph)
The destination.
The FIA World Endurance Championship is where motorsports history is written. This is where those at the highest level of motorsports pit themselves against each other on renowned race tracks around the globe. The race series, which replaced the Intercontinental Le Mans Cup in 2012, is considered one of the toughest in the world, and brings together sports prototypes and Gran Turismos on eight long-distance circuits.
After a 16-year absence, Porsche is in back in the racing car line up for LMP1, the highest class, with the 919 Hybrid.
The classes:
LMP1: Le Mans Prototype class, mainly for works teams. This is the class in which the Porsche 919 Hybrid will compete.

LMP2: Le Mans Prototype class for private teams. This class is only for gasoline-powered racing cars.
GTE-PRO: road-based GT racing cars with pro drivers. The Porsche 911 RSR (991) races in this class.

GTE-AM: road-based GT racing cars with at least one amateur driver. Several Porsche customer teams will compete here with the 911 GT3 RSR (997).
The races:
04.20.2014 / Great Britain
6 Hours of Silverstone
Silverstone Circuit
Length: 3.666 miles | Corners: 18
Silverstone holds a special place in the hearts of motorsports fans not only in Britain but all over the world. The circuit has a rich heritage and, as an established part of Formula One circuit, promises a great start to the season.
05.03.2014 / Belgium
6 Hours of Spa-Francorchamps
Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps
Length: 4.352 miles | Corners: 20
The circuit in the Belgian Ardennes has been renowned for spectacular races since 1966. The last competition before the 24 Hours of Le Mans, it is regarded as a dress rehearsal before the real highlight of the season.
06.14.2014 / France
24 Hours of Le Mans
Circuit de la Sarthe
Length: 8.462 miles | Corners: 38
The 24 Hours of Le Mans is one of the biggest motorsports events in the world and the undisputed high point of the World Endurance Championship. The only race that lasts 24 hours, it demands everything from those who take part and also attracts double points in the championship.
09.20.2014 / USA
6 Hours of Austin
Circuit of the Americas
Length: 3.425 miles | Corners: 20
The Circuit of the Americas is the newest track in Formula One and successor to the Sebring International Raceway. The super-modern circuit, which is located in Austin, Texas, offers racing conditions that meet the highest standards and competition levels.
10.12.2014 / Japan
6 Hours of Fuji
Fuji International Speedway
Length: 2.835 miles | Corners: 16
This fast race track, rebuilt in 2005, lies at the foot of the famous Mount Fuji. Since it opened in 1966, the home track of the Toyota team has witnessed many a thrilling moment in motorsports history. Its Formula One “wet races” are unforgotten.
11.02.2014 / China
6 Hours of Shanghai
Shanghai International Circuit
Length: 3.387 miles | Corners: 16
The race circuit in China’s biggest industrial city has a tough, demanding reputation. The infrastructure of this emerging metropolis is as impressive as the track itself – an ideal location for an endurance race at international level.
11.15.2014 / Bahrain
6 Hours of Bahrain
Bahrain International Circuit
Length: 3.914 miles | Corners: 23
The Bahrain International Circuit is an absolutely top-class race track with the ideal climate to boot – perfect conditions for the penultimate race in the 2014 FIA WEC season.
11.30.2014 / Brazil
6 Hours of Sao Paulo
Autódromo José Carlos Pace
Length: 2.677 miles | Corners: 15
In Sao Paulo’s impressive autodrome, the racing is youthful and electrifying – a bona fide challenge for every driver to pit himself against the best in front of a captivating Brazilian crowd.
The vehicle.
LMP1 Class
It’s the highest classification at the 24 Hours of Le Mans – and the fastest. The abbreviation LMP stands for Le Mans Prototype, which is a reminder of the ultimate goal at the world’s most famous long-distance race: putting sports prototypes to the test. The 1 should need no explanation.
Energy Recovery via KERS
One of the key objectives of the new rules is greater efficiency. And energy recovery plays a special role in this respect. Via KERS, for example. The “Kinetic Energy Recovery System” is primarily used as an electromotive brake. It converts kinetic energy from braking into electrical energy which is then available to the electric motor, for example for boosting.
Exhaust Gas Energy Recovery
The energy contained in the hot exhaust gases from the combustion engine is converted into electrical energy. This can then be supplied to the wheels as drive energy via electric motors. The goal: increasing power train efficiency. There are two possible strategies in this respect: more power and approximately the same fuel consumption, which makes the vehicle faster. Or the same power and lower consumption, which makes the vehicle go fast for longer.
Flywheel Accumulator
A flywheel accumulator is a rotor which rotates up to 40,000 times per minute and stores energy mechanically in the form of rotational energy. It is charged when the vehicle brakes, for example when electric motors on the front axle reverse their function and work as generators. Whenever necessary, the driver can access electricity for the electric motors from the kinetic energy in the flywheel accumulator, for example for short bursts of acceleration (boosting). The main advantages of this system are high performance with a compact and low-weight design and very rapid energy storage and release.
cd Value
The cd value is the drag coefficient, commonly referred to as the “streamlinedness” of an object. The lower the cd value the better the aerodynamic properties, of a vehicle for example. This means lower fuel consumption at the same speed. Or in other words even greater efficiency.
Carbon
Carbon is used as a high-tech material in the aviation and aerospace industry. It has of course also triumphed in the field of Sports Car construction. The underlying principle is that several layers of carbon fiber are embedded in a polymer matrix. For greater rigidity and strength, combined with a lower weight.
Monocoque
The monocoque is the center of operations for every LMP1 driver. The French term means something like “single shell”, but in motorsports it is used to refer to a complex design. Its role as a safety cell for the driver means that stability is one of the top criteria during development, but aerodynamic properties must also always be taken into account. And last but not least, individual factors are also important, such as the height of the driver.